TURNINGS PLUS 2016 HAS NOW FINISHED
(hope you managed to visit ...)


HOPEFULLY - IT WILL BE BACK IN A COUPLE OF YEARS

Pictures from the Exhibition will be on the web site 'shortly'.


A SPECIAL INVITATION
TO ALL INTERESTED IN ANY KIND OF WOODWORKING.

IN 2016 - WOULD YOU LIKE TO:

  • Learn more about the craft of woodworking?
  • Take part in interesting and informative monthly meetings with expert presenters?
  • Attend (mostly for free) regular workshops on turning, carving, furniture making, green woodworking, general, and a range of special workshops held during the year?
  • Become a more skilled and knowledgeable worker of wood?
  • Help contribute to community projects, such as making wig stands and giving toys to the Salvation Army to distribute at Christmas?
  • then click on the link below ...
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION


MEMBERSHIP PROFILE

TONY PEMBERTON

My name is Tony Pemberton, born in Lower Hutt, New Zealand in 1950. I went to school in Taita, served a Tool making apprenticeship with Simon Metal Products then spent 10 years in the drawing office. After this I went into Research & Development in the Medical & Dental area. When this company down sized I went back to tool making with a plastic injection moulding company.

In 1996 I was looking for a hobby and a challenge; I had acquired a Myford Wood Lathe - type ML7. Then Bill Watson, (my boss) lent me a book "WOOD TURNING WIZARDRY." This was the challenge I needed. I worked my way through the book making the tools to make most of the balls illustrated. Then Bill lent me another book in 1997 called Principles & Practices of Ornamental Turning by John Jacob Holtzapffel. This book had the same affect as the first book he showed me and I have been making parts for my lathe ever since.

Some of the parts I have made are:
  1. Drill chuck to fit on tool post.
  2. Eccentric cutter for tool post.
  3. Slide rest
  4. Drill.
  5. Universal cutting frame.
  6. Eccentric cutting frame.
  7. Oval chuck.

In October 1998 I won a scholarship from the National Association of Woodworkers to go to the "LYNN HISTORICAL WOODWORKING TRUST MUSEUM" in Ashburton for a week to learn from Bob Lynn all I could on Ornamental Turning. I visited many people, took many photos and a video of the museum. I am now using these as references when making tools and doing wood turning.

In September 2000 I entered two pieces of Ornamental Turning in the National Wood skills Festival at Kawerau, and won 1st and 2nd prizes in this section.

I came across a picture in a book "Ornamental Turning." By T.D ALSWHAW of a French swash plate turning lathe of 1790. With what I had seen and learnt in Ashburton I thought I could combine the principles of this lathe and the other types of lathes together to make one lathe to do most of what I wanted to do in Ornamental Turning. I bought a SouthBen lathe bed and head stock casting. By putting Linier Bearings in the head stock, turning up the main shaft with the same thread as the Myford lathe allows me to move chucks and work between lathes, Also all the attachments can be used on both lathes, saving me having to make them twice.

Each time I make something new for my lathes and start to learn how to use them it sends me off in a different direction of Ornamental Turning. This is what makes my hobby so interesting.

My ambition is to have made all the attachments I need by the time I retire, then I will be able to go out to my shed and create all day long.

See a selection of Tony's work in the Picture Gallery at
Tony Pemberton (Ornamental Turning).


WIG STANDS PROJECT

It is not generally known that people who lose their hair from cancer or other conditions and who wear wigs need to care for their wigs in a special way. The wigs themselves are expensive (one can be as much as $600 for a very basic model made of artificial fibre and many thousands for one made of human hair).

Such an expensive item needs proper storage when not being used and one of the simple ways to do so is by having a special stand on which to hang the wig. (See an example at left.)

A few years ago several Woodworking Guilds banded together to make suitable stands for this purpose. The Guild of Woodworkers Wellington is one such Guild. (Others in the Wellington area are South Wairarapa and Kapiti.) Between us we aim to make 400 a year.

Why not join us? The stand is relatively simple to make and is a good way of keeping your turning skills honed.

CLICK HERE FOR A SET OF INSTRUCTIONS.






Guild of Woodworkers, Wellington, New Zealand.
You may use material from this site, but please acknowledge the source.